درحال مشاهده: مهندسی و مدیریت ساخت پروژه

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p3 express Daily Activities

1395/12/26
18:57
امیرحسین ستوده بیدختی
p3 express

p3 express
A22. Capture RICs
This is a Daily Activity; the way a Project Manager continuously contributes to the project, and teams.
The Project Manager should always be looking for RICs (Risks, Issues, and Change Requests). Whenever you find out about a new RIC, it will be captured in your Journal (e.g. a mobile application). It’s important to write it down immediately, otherwise you may forget it, and nevertheless, it consumes your mental energy to try to remember them.
Then, whenever you’re behind your desk, you will review the Journal, and move the important items to the RIC Register. Those that are too simple can be left in your Journal until you close them.
Note: using the GTD method is a good idea for this purpose.
A23. React to RICs, based on Delegation Limits
This is a Daily Activity; the way a Project Manager continuously contributes to the project, and teams.
When you identify a new RIC (Risk, Issue, or Change Request), it’s time to react to it based on the Delegation Limits. The first step is to measure the consequences of the RIC on time and cost of the project. If both are below the Delegation Limits, the Project Manager will decide about them, and otherwise it will be escalated to the Sponsor.
The main purpose is to proactively respond to RICs, as soon as possible. It’s best if you get help from Team Leaders, Supplier PMs, and Customer PM for more complex items. If you can’t find a satisfying solution, gather all team members and ask them to help you. You should facilitate such a workshop properly to enable The Wisdom of Crowds, instead of creating Groupthinking. Check A26 for more information about it.
A24. Accept completed products from the Team Leaders and Supplier PMs
This is a Daily Activity; the way a Project Manager continuously contributes to the project, and teams.

 مهندسی و مدیریت ساخت  (ICEMA)  Construction Engineering Management


Deliverables assigned to Team Leaders and Supplier PMs can be completed any day, and that’s time for a quick review and approval by the Project Manager. The approval in this activity is preliminary. The Project Manager shouldn’t be afraid of approval, as it slows down the project.
Large amounts of work-in-progress is a common problem in projects. It reduces the predictability of the project, takes more resources, and usually lowers quality. It’s best to limit it, and have a clear activity for receiving and approving the deliverables.

p3 express Weekly Activities

1395/12/26
18:53
امیرحسین ستوده بیدختی

p3 express
p3 express
A17. Measure and report performance
This is a weekly activity. You can repeat the weekly activities in a certain day of the week (e.g. every Monday). Remember that A17 to A21 should be run in sequence.
We measure the progress of the project in this activity, using the Schedule Model and Progress Register. This information will be used to manage deviations in the next activity.
These are the steps for measuring progress:
The progress of project activities is captured, and stored in the Schedule Model. Using stepped progresses is always preferred to gradual percent complete values; e.g. Only three values of 0%, 60%, and 100%; the activity has 0% progress until it’s submitted for approval; it becomes 60% after it’s submitted, and 100% when it’s approved.
The Earned Value of the whole project is read from the Schedule Model and stored in the Progress Register.
The Actual Cost of the whole project is entered in the Progress Register.
The Earned Schedule related parameters are calculated automatically in the Progress Register.
The cost and time forecast of the project is calculated automatically in the Progress Register, and presented in the Dashboard sheet.
All stakeholders will have access to the Dashboard.
The PM Support checks to make sure all relevant stakeholders have seen the Dashboard.
Using the online dashboard is preferred, but if some stakeholders are not comfortable with it, save a PDF and email it to them.
Avoid too much detail in progress measurement, as it distracts everyone, and doesn’t provide real additional value. The Project Manager may need extra details for finding solutions to recover from deviations and prevent similar problems in the future, which will be provided by the PM Support, but they are not part of the standard measurements and dashboards.
A18. Manage deviations
This is a weekly activity. You can repeat the weekly activities in a certain day of the week (e.g. every Monday). Remember that A17 to A21 should be run in sequence.
The purpose of measuring progress is to find deviations and fix them.
The forecasts for time and cost are compared to the targets in the Progress Register. If there are deviations, you should compare them with Plan Limits. If both time and cost forecasts are below their Plan Limits, then the Project Manager decides on how to fix them. Otherwise, it means that you cannot meet the targets, and you should find a serious way for fixing the problems. The issue should be escalated to the Sponsor, and everyone checks the possible solutions. When the Sponsor selects a solution, it will be reflected to the plans using the Cycle Planning activities (A12 to A16).
A19. Weekly kick-off
This is a weekly activity. You can repeat the weekly activities in a certain day of the week (e.g. every Monday). Remember that A17 to A21 should be run in sequence.
When you’re done with managing deviations, it’s time to have a quick, and simple weekly kick-off. Two hours should be enough for it. The Project Manager gathers all Team Leaders, Supplier PMs, PM Supports, and other key people (if required) for the following:
Reviewing what you’re going to do in the coming week, to make sure everyone is synchronized. Remember that what people say here should not be used for checking the performance, or blaming the teams if they couldn’t get them done.
Reviewing the problems they may have in the coming week. These risks or issues are recorded in the RIC Register or Journal, and managed like other RICs. Remember that one of the main responsibilities of a Project Manager is to help the teams by solving their problems.
Encouraging the teams to limit their work in progress, and get the in-progress packages done as soon as possible. Having a lot of in-progress work reduces productivity, quality, and predictability.
A20. Weekly Audit
This is a weekly activity. You can repeat the weekly activities in a certain day of the week (e.g. every Monday). Remember that A17 to A21 should be run in sequence.
Now it’s time to audit yourself using the questionnaire in the Project Health Register, and get a score. This audit is only about the quality of your project management system, rather than the product you’re creating in the project.
Your absolute score is not as important as having an improving score: each week a little better than the previous one.
A21. Focused Communication
This is a weekly activity. You can repeat the weekly activities in a certain day of the week (e.g. every Monday). Remember that A17 to A21 should be run in sequence.
The Project Manager sends a short message to everyone involved in the project, and briefs them on what’s going to be done in the coming week, and the risks that may affect it, as well as the plans to respond to those risks.
The purpose is to ensure everyone is aligned with the overall goal of the project, and there won’t be conflicts among teams and suppliers.
Examples

 مهندسی و مدیریت ساخت  (ICEMA)  Construction Engineering Management


Hi everyone,
We’re just done with the weekly kick-off, and the review of the plans. Based on that, we’ve planned to complete the structure in Block B, solve all the remaining utility problems in Block A, and install windows in all floors in Block A.
As you know, installing windows was scheduled for later, but because of the strange weather this year, there’s a risk of having sub-zero temperature in the near future, which creates a lot of problems for our finishing activities. The best plan we’d come up with is the new schedule for installing windows. So, everyone, please support your colleagues in this high priority deliverable.
Hi everyone,
I wish you had a great weekend. This week, we’ll be focused on two things: fixing the problem with our staging environment that slows everything down, and preparing for the next release by finishing the remaining Must-Have items. Please keep it simple and only focus on delivering the essential parts; any fancy feature would be done later, when we’re sure there would be no problem with the release.

p3 express Cycle Planning

1395/12/26
18:51
امیرحسین ستوده بیدختی
p3 express



A12. Update the PMIS
This activity is part of the Cycle Planning. Each cycle is a month, and starts by detailing the high-level plan created in the Preparation for the upcoming month. This section shouldn't take more than 3 days.
Each month starts with a quick refinement of the plans. P3.express uses a gradual planning process: a high-level plan is created in the Preparing section, and then more details added every month, to show exactly what we’re going to do in the upcoming month.
It’s best for the Project Manager and the PM Support to facilitate workshops for the key team members to contribute to planning, or even handle the whole planning with the minimum required supervision.
These are the steps you need to take in this activity:
Check the direction of the project with the Sponsor
Check the Configuration Map and see if it’s required to break down some of the building blocks that will be the subject of the upcoming month.
Reflect the Configuration Map changes into the WBS of the Schedule Model and the Project Files Directory (the directory can have fewer levels than the map).
Try to find more risks that may affect the project in the next month, and capture them in the RIC Register.
Plan, or refine the existing plans of the items in the RIC Register, especially those that may affect the work in the upcoming month.
Add more details to the parts of the Schedule Model that will be executed during the upcoming month.
Save a new Baseline for the Schedule Model, and adjust the planned values in the Progress Register if required.
Revise the Business Case

 مهندسی و مدیریت ساخت  (ICEMA)  Construction Engineering Management


When there are external suppliers, all A12 activities should be aligned, and done in the same time.
P3.express uses a form of planning called Manage by Stages, or Rolling-Wave Planning. While it has its own advantages, there’s a risk that you will be focused only on the short-term, and do not pay enough attention to the risks that may happen later. Sometime it’s too late to proactively control a risk right before the time it may happen. Remember that risk management is about the whole project.
A13. [select suppliers and agree on the Supplier PMs]
This activity is part of the Cycle Planning. Each cycle is a month, and starts by detailing the high-level plan created in the Preparation for the upcoming month. This section shouldn't take more than 3 days.
This optional activity is for selecting external suppliers, and agreeing on their Project Managers. Make sure that their Project Managers are capable enough to support the P3.express flow.
When you’re done with this activity, add the information about the new supplier and their Project Manager to the Project Summary.
A14. Go/No-Go
This activity is part of the Cycle Planning. Each cycle is a month, and starts by detailing the high-level plan created in the Preparation for the upcoming month. This section shouldn't take more than 3 days.
When the monthly planning is done, the Sponsor has to make a new Go/No-Go decision based on the Business Case. This is to make sure the project is still justifiable, and reminds everyone that there’s a goal to the project, higher than the isolated specialist activities.
If it’s decided to stop the project, the Closing activities will be run, and you can decide whether or not to have the Post-Project cycle.
A15. Cycle kick-off
This activity is part of the Cycle Planning. Each cycle is a month, and starts by detailing the high-level plan created in the Preparation for the upcoming month. This section shouldn't take more than 3 days.
You need to get everyone together for a couple of hours to a full day, for a team-building activity (e.g. going hiking, to a picnic, etc). Be sure that people are socializing with their peers in other companies (if there are external companies) rather than their coworkers in the same company.
By conducting this activity properly, the professional communications among experts will be more effective in the future, which benefits the project significantly.
A16. Focused Communication
This activity is part of the Cycle Planning. Each cycle is a month, and starts by detailing the high-level plan created in the Preparation for the upcoming month. This section shouldn't take more than 3 days.
Send a message to everyone, and tell them about the expected achievements in the upcoming month, and the risks involved, as well as planned responses to those risks. It’s important to let everyone know their role in the overall achievements of the project, and ensure they are aligned with the goals, rather than focused on isolated specialist activities.
Examples
Hi everyone,
We’re going to start the next cycle for ProjectXYZ.
First, I have to thank Mary for bringing up the risk of new regulation, and all of you for helping find the best response to it.
Based on the planned response, and our project schedule, we really need to complete the three main features of the backend during this cycle, and submit it for approval; otherwise everything will be uncertain in the project.
If you had any questions about those features, the best person who can help you is Michael.
Hi everyone,
We’re starting a new cycle in ProjectABC. Unfortunately, we’re two months behind schedule, and it’s getting serious. What we need to do is to reduce this to about 6 weeks until the end of this month, and the best way to do it is to focus most of our effort on resolving the conflicts between utility and structural designs, and get their approval. So, I’d like to ask all team members involved in construction to give priority to helping their peers in the headquarter, especially by providing their hands-on experience in the project.


p3 express Preparing

1395/12/26
18:44
امیرحسین ستوده بیدختی
p3 express


A01. Appoint the Sponsor
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
The first thing you need to do is to appoint a person as the Sponsor for the project; a senior manager (preferably a board member) who:
Owns the project outcome
Funds and resources the project
Makes high-level decisions for the project
The Project Manager reports to this person.
The amount of time needed from a Sponsor is minimized in the flow, as senior managers are usually busy. They should be able to spend 5 to 10 hours per month on the project after the Preparation, and up to 30 hours for Preparation
A02. Prepare the Project Summary
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
As soon as the Sponsor is appointed, they outline the Project Summary. This is a document that will be organized and updated by the Project Manager later.
The Sponsor can use a simple text file instead of the template at this time. These topics should be outlined there:
The goal
The benefits
Main requirements and quality expectations
A rough estimate of cost and time
Major risks (usually 2 to 5 is enough)
Customer PM (if exists)
Everything is short, and in plain language. The Project Summary is expected to be less than a page.
A03. Appoint the Project Manager
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
Then the Sponsor discusses the project with potential Project Managers, using the outlined Project Summary, and finally agrees with one of them. It’s important to have a Project Manager who believes in project objectives and targets.
In case of internal projects (those without external customers), the Project Manager comes from the business side of the company, rather than the technical side. Managers from the technical side are Team Leaders in P3.express.
A04. Set up the PMIS
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
Then the Project Manager sets up the PMIS (Project Management Information System). It’s a central place for technical, administrative, and managerial data and information in the project.
Use the following steps in this activity:
Create a folder or container for project files. It can be on an online storage (e.g. Dropbox, Google Drive, One Drive), or an internal server in your company.
Download the templates below, and add them to the folder.
Make sure there’s an automated system for saving daily backups.
It’s recommended to have a versioning system.
When using internal servers, it’s recommended to have a synchronized offline access to the files.
When using internal servers, it’s recommended to have a VPN server for remote access.
Give read/write access to appropriate stakeholders.
The following are the PMIS elements. The way they are used is explained in related activities.
Remember the following about all PMIS elements:
They are all about your perspective to the project; e.g. the Business Case is about the justification of the project for you, rather than the external customer.
Keep everything simple, clear, and in plain language.
Remember that adding more detail to the documents is not necessarily useful; it may be counter productive.
Project Summary
Project Summary is a simple text file that provides the high-level information of the project, including its goal, targets (cost and time), roles, etc.
Download the template
Business Case
The Business Case is a text file that explains the justification of the project, and major risks that can affect the justification, as well as information on how to measure benefits during, and after the project.
Download the template
Configuration Map
Configuration Map is a mind-map that shows the composition of the product, with acceptance criteria and status. It’s used to create a product-based understanding for the project.
The highest level of the mind-map is the final product of the project. Then it’s broken down into its main functional parts, each part into smaller building blocks, and so on. Make sure you’re not using organizational departments or functional units as a basis for the break-down. This concept is the same as a well-formed WBS (Work Breakdown Structure), or a PBS (Product Breakdown Structure).
You may have the temptation to ignore creating a mind-map of the Configuration and directly create it as a WBS in the scheduling software. This is unacceptable in P3.express, as using the scheduling software for this purpose will generate an activity-based point of view.
No template is needed for this element.
Project Files Directory
The Project Files Directory is a hierarchical set of directories/folders that will be used to store all project files (technical, administrative, etc). The hierarchy is a replicate of the Configuration Map, possibly with fewer levels. This helps you keep a product-based perspective throughout the project.
It’s best to use a template to name the files. The template doesn’t have to include too much information; it’s usually easier to add the information to the metadata.
No template is needed for this element.
Schedule Model
The Schedule Model is created in a project scheduling software (e.g. Microsoft Project), and contains the activities, and their information such as dependencies, duration, and cost. Its WBS (Work Breakdown Structure) is a replicate of the Configuration Map.
A high-level Schedule model is first created in the Preparation section, and then details will be added to the same model during Cycle Planning activities. The model may be adjusted in the Weekly Activities.
The model has two purposes: to provide the appropriate sequence of work, and to be used to measure progress, find deviations, and meet the targets by recovering fro those deviations.
No template is needed for this element.
Progress Register
The Progress Register is a spreadsheet that contains information on planned and actual performance data, and a simple dashboard for controlling the project.
Download the template, or a sample
Journal
Journal is a physical notebook, mobile application, etc. that the Project Manager uses to capture RIC (Risk, Issue, and Change Request) information immediately. The less important ones will be tracked in the Journal, while important ones will be moved to the RIC Register.
When selecting an application, make sure it’s easy for you to use it. More features, such as task management functionalities, can be helpful, but are not crucial. If you find them distracting, just use a simple note taking application.
No matter what you use for your Journal (physical notebook, mobile phone, tablet, etc), it should always be with you.
No template is needed for this element.
RIC Register
RIC Register is a spreadsheet that contains information about all Risks, Issues, and Change Requests, and well as their response plans.
Download the template, or a sample
Project Health Register
Project Health Register is a spreadsheet that contains all evaluation and audit information, as well as improvement plans.
You can use Google Forms, or an alternative, to send the evaluation questionnaire
Download the template, or a sample
Suggested Software
You need 5 pieces of software for the PMIS elements:
Project Summary and Business Case: a word processor
Progress Register, RIC Register, and Project Health Register: a spreadsheet
Configuration Map: a mind mapping software
Schedule Model: a project scheduling software
Journal: a note taking software (unless you prefer to use a physical notebook)
You also need a storage for these, and also the Project Files Directory.
The following are suggestions for each of them.
Suggested Solutions for Storage
Online file hosting services. Team members can use the official clients of these services to create local, synchronized folders on their computers, and use the files more conveniently. They also provide version control, basic access control, and simple forms of backup. You still need to make external weekly backups manually, using third-party applications, or using scripts. The following are the major providers in this category:
Microsoft OneDrive
Google Drive
DropBox
Company’s servers, or an external hard-drive connected to the network. In this case, the following features should be made available for the storage:
Automatic Backups
Versioning
Access control
VPN, or another way of accessing the files from outside the company
A document management system or a system that covers document management, such as Alfresco or Sharepoint. It’s only recommended to those who already have such a system and prefer not to have parallel systems; otherwise, just use one of the first two simple options.
A sophisticated project management software that covers document management, such as Oracle and SAP solutions, or online ones like Basecamp. It’s only recommended to those who already have such a system and prefer not to have parallel systems; otherwise, just use one of the first two simple options.
Having project files distributed in project members’ computers without a centralized space is not acceptable.
If you don’t know which option is best, or you don’t have any preference, we suggest using a cloud storage.
Suggested Word Processors and Spreadsheets
Microsoft Office (desktop)
Microsoft Office 365 / Microsoft Office Online (web-based)
Google Docs (web-based)
LibreOffice (desktop)
There are two main criteria for selecting a piece of software here: 1) which one is more familiar for you and the rest of the team, and 2) which one is better integrated with your storage system.
Suggested Mind Mapping Applications
xMind (desktop)
MindJet (desktop)
FreeMind (desktop)
WiseMapping (web-based)
MindMup (web-based)
We don’t expect a lot of fancy features from the mind-mapping software. You can just pick the one that you’re most comfortable with.
Suggested Scheduling Software
Microsoft Project (desktop)
Microsoft Project 365 (web-based)
Oracle Primavera (desktop)
GanttProject (desktop)
LibrePlan (desktop)
LiquidPlanner (web-based)
OpenProject (web-based)
ProjectLibre (desktop and web-based)
Basecamp (web-based)
Your choice here is not critical for small projects with simple schedule models. However, for larger or relatively complicated projects, it’s best to select a scheduling software that you’re most familiar with. Remember that your schedules are not supposed to be complex in P3.express; a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, and we usually have weaker domains in project management to take care of, instead of spending more effort on scheduling.
Suggested Note Taking Software
Evernote
Toodledo
OneNote
SimpleNote
Any.Do
You can always use a simple physical notebook and a pen for the Journal, given that you have it with you all the time.
Having an application that is simple and easy to use is more important than having one with lots of fancy features. The whole point for a Journal is to open it quickly, and write down a RIC, before you forget it.
Sample PMIS Configurations
Google Drive storage + Google Apps, Microsoft Project, xMind, EverNote
Microsoft OneDrive storage + Microsoft Office, Microsoft Project, xMind, OneNote
DropBox storage + Microsoft Office, LiquidPlanner, MindJet, SimpleNote
A simple file server in the company with required features + LibreOffice, LibrePlan, FreeMind, ToodleDo
Support
Setting up the PMIS is very easy. However, if you and other team members are not confident about it, you can simply ask help from your IT department to see which configuration is best. Try to have a conversation with them and go through all alternatives.
A05. Appoint the rest of the team
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
Then it’s time to appoint the rest of the key roles in the project.
The Sponsor selects a few people as Consultants; those who can help the Sponsor understand the end-users and suppliers.
The Project Manager may want to select a few people who assist them in project management activities, called PM Support (e.g. planners).
In case parts of the project is delivered within your company, there will be one or more internal teams. The Project Manager appoints the Team Leaders at this point.
Note: the project is not approved yet, and nothing is going to be developed at this moment. However, we still need to have the roles assigned, to collaborate on the preparation. The same roles will be involved in delivery of the project if it’s approved.
Project Team Structure
The above image shows the Project Team Structure in P3.express.
It’s important to note different perspectives to the same project when multiple companies are involved:
Multiple perspectives to the project
In this image, you’re the Project Manager in your company’s perspective, the Supplier PM in your customer’s perspective, and Customer PM in your supplier’s perspective.
Each company has its own project management system (Project Team structure, PMIS, Project Flow), and responsibilities to the companies above or below them. Everything explained in P3.express is about your own perspective, rather than that of the customer or suppliers. For example, the Business Case explained in P3.express is about the justification of the project for your company, which can be different from that of the customer. You may help the customer create their own Business Case, but it won’t be part of the management documents in your PMIS, and won’t be used to direct the project in your perspective.
The following is a summary of P3.express roles.
Sponsor
The Sponsor is a senior manager, and preferably a director.
Responsibilities:
Making high-level decisions for the project, without getting themselves involved in the details, and without limiting the power of the Project Manager
Funding the project
Resourcing the project (especially when the project uses shared resources)
Championing the project
Approving the Business Case
Approving the plans, with a high-level perspective (e.g. total cost and duration)
Making the Go/No-Go decisions (A09 and A14)
Setting the Delegation Limits and Plan Limits
Making decision for RICs (Risks, Issues, and Change Requests) that are above the Delegation Limits (e.g. signing contracts with external suppliers)
Making decision on the project approach when deviations are above the Plan Limits
Appointing the Project Manager and Consultants
Conduct the Post-Project activities, if there’s no program or portfolio management system for that
Competencies
Have authority in the company
Have interest in the project
Understand the business aspects of the project
Capable of delegating power / not a micro-manager
Able to spend 5 to 10 hours per month on the project
Understand value and benefit management
Have a strategic point of view, and focus on outcomes and benefits, instead of products and activities
Be a good leader
Have skills in negotiation and conflict resolution
Project Manager
Project Manager is the person who supports the team members to realize their potentials, and get the project done withing time, cost, scope, and quality targets. They are facilitators, coordinators, leaders, coaches, and mentors, rather than bosses.
The Project Manager reports to the Sponsor.
Responsibilities:
Setting up the PMIS
Facilitating the meetings (can be delegated)
Ensuring the health (physical and mental) and safety of the team members
Ensuring that regulations and laws are followed in the project
Leading the planning and monitoring activities, and approving the output
Leading the audit and satisfaction evaluation activities, and facilitating the improvement planning
Making decisions within the Delegation Limits and Plan Limits
Appointing the PM Support(s) and Team Leader(s)
Approving Supplier PM(s)
Handling the Focused Communications during the project
Making sure that RICs (Risks, Issues, and Change Requests) are identified and controlled
Accepting completed products from the Team Leaders and Supplier PMs
Capabilities
Leadership
Facilitation skills
Coaching, mentoring, negotiation, and problem solving skills
A good listener
Result oriented
Complete understanding of P3.express
Knowledge of the following is advantageous:
PRINCE2®
PMBOK® Guide
Agile methods and frameworks
Program management
Portfolio management
Value management
Business Analysis
Refer to ICB for more information on Project Manager competencies.
Consultant
Consultants are officially appointed to help the Sponsor by bringing expertise and information on the following areas:
Business needs, and benefits/value management
End-users
Suppliers and technical people involved in the project
PM Support
PM Support is anyone who’s officially appointed to help the Project Manager with their activities. They can be project planners, risk analysts, business analysts, document librarians, or generic assistants.
Team Leader
Each internal team in the company that is responsible for developing part of the product needs to have a Team Leader, who reports to the Project Manager. Team Leaders are technical people, as opposed to Project Managers who do not need to be technical.
Responsibilities:
Participate in planning and monitoring of the project (including RIC {Risks, Issues, and Change Requests} identification)
Report performance to the Project Manager
Coordinate the team members
Collaborate with other Team Leaders and Supplier PM(s) to avoid conflicts
Capabilities:
Similar to the Project Manager
Customer PM
In case of external projects, there would be a Customer PM, in touch with the Project Manager, for coordinating and transferring information. This is specifically important when the customer has multiple suppliers, and they should be aligned.
In smaller projects when the customer doesn’t have a real Project Manager to play this role, we still expect one person from their side to be appointed as the contact point for the Project Manager; this person will be called the Customer PM.
Responsibilities:
Providing the necessary information for planning and monitoring to the Project Manager (including scope and quality expectations)
Making sure the Project Manager is coordinated with other Project Managers or Team Leaders who are working on the same project
Making sure the internal team members are available to the kick-off meetings, and regular communications
Capabilities:
Being available to the project
Being result-oriented
Supplier PM
In case of having external suppliers, there will be a Supplier PM in each company as the contact point with the Project Manager.
Responsibilities:
Similar to the Team Leader
Capabilities:
Similar to the Project Manager
A06. Populate the PMIS
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
When we have all the key roles in place, we start populating the PMIs, which is a form of high-level planning. At the end of this activity, we will know if the project is feasible and worth investing. This study can be done on one option (usually when the project belongs to external customers), or using multiple options (usually for internal projects) that ends with selecting the best one.
The Project Manager leads and facilitated planning, and gets a lot of help from everyone else. It’s best to do it in a workshop with all key team members available, instead of interviewing them separately.
This is how you can populate the PMIS:
Prepare the Configuration Map: this is a hierarchical breakdown of the building blocks of the project, prepared as a mind-map. The Project Manager or PM Support conducts a facilitated workshop with all or enough team members, and they create the mind-map together. It might be required to bring in informed external people to help with this (e.g. other Project Managers from similar projects).
Create the Project Files Directory: the Project Files Directory structure is the same as the Configuration Map, possibly with fewer levels. It can be a series of nested folders in a file system, or container structure in a document management system. This structure will be used to store all the technical and administrative files in the project.
Update and reformat the Project Summary: the Project Summary is first created by the Sponsor, with limited pieces of information. In this point, the Project Manager uses the template to rebuild the document, and also adds the extra information.
Identify risks and store them in the RIC Register: in this stage, you can focus only on high-level risks (both threats and opportunities). This should be done in a facilitated workshop similar to the one used for preparing the Configuration Map.
Plan responses to risks and capture them in the RIC Register: plan the identified risks, as it might change the path of the project. This can be done in another facilitated workshops.
Prepare a high-level Schedule Model: use a facilitated workshop with all team members to identify high-level activities, their dependencies, and duration.
Add planned values to the Progress Register: first baseline the Schedule Model in the planning software, and then copy the high-level planned values to the Progress Register.
Prepare the Business Case: the Sponsor should be involved in preparing the Business Case, while everyone else collaborates by providing the necessary information.
You may need to repeat some of these steps; e.g. identify more risks when you’ve scheduled the project.
If a feasibility study has not been done before, it will be entirely covered using the steps discussed in this activity. The main element that helps you check the feasibility is the Business Case. However, you may need to check multiple options before finalizing your decision about the feasibility of the project.
Normally, we expect alternative options to be evaluated in the program or portfolio management system and only the selected solution be considered here. However, if you’re still considering multiple solutions, you need to plan them separately using the steps here, and then use the generated information (specially the Business Case) to see which option is the best.
Configuration Map
The Configuration Map is a hierarchical breakdown of the product, created as a mind-map. It helps you understand what the project is supposed to produce, and will also help you prepare the Schedule Model and organize the Project Files Directory.
The highest level of the mind-map is the final product of the project. Then you break it down into its main functional parts, and each part into smaller building elements. You also need to add acceptance criteria of each node as a comment.
Notes:
The Configuration is almost the same as a well-formed WBS (Work Breakdown Structure), or a Product Breakdown Structure.
You may have the temptation to ignore creating a mind-map of the configuration and directly create it as a WBS in the scheduling software. This is unacceptable in P3.express, as using the scheduling software for this purpose will generate an activity-based point of view.
All elements of the Configuration Map must have a unique name.
Use product-based names for the Configuration Map elements, rather than activity-based names (e.g. “Doors on the second floor”, instead of “Installing doors on the second floor”).
In case of external projects, remember that this is only the configuration of your responsibilities in the project, rather than everything the customer needs for the project. They may ask for your help creating a wider configuration for the whole project, but that’s their concept and is not part of the management documents in your PMIS.
All nodes in the Configuration Map have some information about their acceptance criteria. This information can be added to the elements gradually, instead of at this point.
It’s helpful if you add comments to the items in the lowest level of the Configuration Map, and explain their scope.
Project Files Directory
The project files should be organized, to make sure everyone is using the latest version of all files, the history of revisions is not lost, it’s easy to search for and find specific files or groups of files (e.g. the latest version of all structural designs in the project), and finally, that you can use them as references in your future projects.
There are two major ways of organizing the project files, and creating the “Project Files Directory”:
In a file system, on the cloud (Google Drive, Dropbox, OneDrive, etc.), or in your own intranet/server
In a document management system hosted on the cloud, or in your own servers
We discourage using personal computers for saving the Project Files Directory, as they won’t be accessible to everyone. Most cloud-based file systems (e.g. Google Drive) allow you to have a synchronized copy on your computer, while there’s also a centralized copy.
No matter how you manage your files, they MUST be organized based on the Configuration Map of the project. In case of using a simple file system, you should create a hierarchy of folders based on the Configuration Map, and use it to store files. There’s always one folder for the whole project, using the name of the project. Then there are two folders, one called “Project Management”, that contains the rest of the PMIS elements, and a “Product” folder that will contain the Configuration Map elements.
RIC Register
The RIC Register is a list of all notable risks, issues, and change requests you’ve identified in the project, with their planned responses, and historical information. The goal is to document each item as soon as it’s identified, and follow up on it until it is closed, with a proactive approach.
Schedule Model
The Schedule Model is simulated model of how your project activities can be executed, based on their dependencies. There’s only one Schedule Model for the project, while more detail is added to it every Cycle.
The WBS of the Schedule Model is based on the Configuration Map. More detailed activities are added gradually, at each Cycle, instead of all at the beginning.
There are two main purposes for having a Schedule Model:
It tells you what to do next, based on dependencies, to maximize the chances of meeting the project targets
It helps you evaluate the current state of your project, measure deviations, and then plan for recovering them and consequently, deliver the project on time and budget (or as close as possible)
Scheduling rules:
Activities should have unique names, to prevent problem and confusion.
Activity names should have a verb (or a similar element); for example “install doors in the second floor” instead of “second floor doors”.
Each activity should have at least one FS or SS predecessor, to let its start be affected by the network. The starting activity/milestone is an exception.
Each activity should have at least one FS or FF successor, to let its finish affect the network. The ending activity/milestone is an exception.
At least 90% of the dependencies should be FS, as its the closest model to the real world dependencies.
Avoid SF relationships as much as possible, as there’s usually no real-world example of it.
Don’t use dependency lags and leads longer than 50% of the duration of the predecessor and successor
Date constraints that prevent activities from moving to later dates should not be used, as they destroy the dynamic nature of the model.
Check activities with long floats for missing dependencies.
Note:
The Schedule Model is a dynamic concept based on the dependencies among elements, rather than a static list of dates that are never updates. The planned dates always change in a Schedule Model, to reflect the reality. The static concept used for comparing with the actual performance is called a Baseline.
Schedule Models are usually too detailed, and too complex, which is not effective as the rest of the project management system is not as mature as it: the chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Keep the Schedule Model as simple as possible, and spend your extra effort on managing the RIC Register instead.
Use a project scheduling software such as Microsoft Project.
It’s OK to send the Gantt Charts to stakeholders, but try to limit is and help them focus on the Progress Register’s Dashboard instead. The Gantt Chart is mainly a technical tool for the PM Support, and sometimes for the Project Manager.
In case of external projects, remember that the Schedule Model mentioned here is only about your responsibilities in the project, rather than the wider Schedule Model for the whole project defined in the customer side. They might ask you for help composing their own Schedule Model, but that’s not part of the management documents in your PMIS. The Activities in your Schedule Model may have external dependencies to activities of other suppliers working in parallel with you.
Progress Register
We measure progress to understand deviations, and try to reach the goal by recovering from those deviations.
Progress is measured based on the following two main variables:
Cost: based on a simple form of Earned Value Management
Time: based on a simple form of Earned Schedule Management
Other variables, such as quality, are expected to be reflected in the two primary variables mentioned before.
Progress Register captures the following sub-elements:
A summary of planned values, based on the baselines
The aggregate of the performance data, analyzed by the scheduling software
Forecasts, that are calculated based on the previous two sets of data, and are the main progress measurements
Limits, including the Plan Limits, used to see when it’s required to escalate the deviation and replan the Cycle.
Dashboard, which is a simple, visual representation of the performance, used instead of common reports.
Note:
Most projects spend too much time on scheduling and measuring performance, which is mostly wasted, as the rest of the project management system is not as mature as that domain; a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Keep your scheduling and measurements simple, and rough: that’s enough for your project. If you have enough time and energy, spend it on managing RIC Register instead.
There’s a small overlap between what we have in parts of the Progress Register, and what is usually stored in the Schedule Model (depending on the scheduling software). Don’t worry about the duplicate, as managing the information in the scheduling software is usually complex, and it’s more product-based to do it using the Progress Register.
We don’t use common, long, boring reports in P3.express. Instead, almost-realtime dashboards are available for all stakeholders to stay informed of the progress of the project. The dashboard doesn’t provide all the possible information, but that’s exactly the point: you should direct the stakeholders to stay focused on the big-picture, rather than details. You, as the Project Manager, will need more details for controlling the project, which can be generated on an ad-hoc basis with the help of PM Support (project planners).
We strongly discourage you from using any measures other than the two mentioned here, as they are usually activity-based and mislead you.
It’s best to use the template, instead of building your own.
In case of external projects, remember that the progress information mentioned here is only about the scope and Configuration Map of your responsibilities in the project, rather than the wider scope of project defined in the customer side. They may ask you for help measuring the wider scope, but that’s not part of the management documents in your PMIS.
Business Case
The Business Case explains the justification of the project for your company.
The Business Case has three main purposes:
Continuously checking the justification of the project, and stop the project if it’s not working for you
Use it to make better high-level decisions that help you achieve the benefits, and the goal mentioned in the Project Summary
It’s also used for tracking the benefits after the project is finished, which generates invaluable information for future projects, and also recovers benefits with simple actions.
Notes:
All benefits are just rough estimates, and that’s enough for us. Don’t try to make them precise, as it’s not possible, and will waste your energy.
In case of external projects, remember that the Business Case mentioned here is about the justification of the project for your company, rather than the customer. They have their own Business Case, and may ask you for help preparing it, but that Business Case belongs to them, and is not part of the management documents in your PMIS.
A07. [Select suppliers and agree on the Supplier PMs]
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
This is an optional activity for projects that have external suppliers. You can select none, some, or all of them in this point, or in activity A13. It’s preferred to do it as soon as possible.
Remember that Supplier PMs have an important role in your project structure, and you need to be careful with the selection.
When you’re done with this activity, add the information about the new supplier and their Project Manager to the Project Summary.
A09. Go/No-Go
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
At this point, the Project Manager provides all the information in the PMIS to the Sponsor, and the Sponsor makes the Go/No-Go decision, mainly based on the Business Case.
In case you have an external customer, this is the time you decide to sign the contract, or excuse yourself. If you’re going to have external suppliers and some of them are selected in A07, then you might want to sign the contract with them now.
Make sure everyone understands that a No-Go decision is not a failure; it’s a sign of having a successful system that understands what’s not beneficial for the company and doesn’t waste resources on it.
A10. Project kick-off
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
If the project is approved in the previous activity, it’s time for all stakeholders to get together, and start the project by a kick-off.
This kick-off meeting is a team-building opportunity. It’s best to spend one full day on it, outside the company. People from different companies (if there are) network with each other. The Project Manager facilitates this with entertaining activities.
A11. Focused Communication
This activity is part of the Preparing section of the Project Flow. Preparation starts as soon as you have the idea or offer for the project, and ends with the decision to execute/accept the project, or drop it. Checking the feasibility or possible options for the project happens in this section as well.
Hang a banner in your company to announce the start of the project, and send an email to everyone, and explain why the company has decided to do the project, and how it will benefit them.
The main purpose of this activity is creating commitment, and encouraging collaboration.
Examples
Hi everyone,
As you know, we’ve been preparing for a new project in the past months. It’s a 300 unit residential building for ABC-Co. Fortunately, the project is approved now!
It’s a two year project, with a great contract price. However, that’s not our only reason. As you know, the local government is going to initiate many social housing projects in the next 10 years, and this is one of the first. If we are successful in this project, we can get more of them.
So, it’s important for us to 1) learn more about high-volume projects like this, and how we can optimize our efforts, and 2) deliver a high-quality project on time, and withing budget. Well, being on time is more important than being within budget; we can earn more from the future projects.
So, let’s have a great project together. Don’t hesitate to contact me if you had any questions or considerations.
Hi everyone,

 مهندسی و مدیریت ساخت  (ICEMA)  Construction Engineering Management


I have good news: the office redecoration project we’ve been waiting for is approved, and will be started on Monday. It’s a three month intensive project with two purposes: creating a better image for our customers, and creating a more productive and comfortable environment for ourselves. We may have some distractions in our daily work during this project, and I hope you help minimize the consequences with your support.
Don’t hesitate to contact me or John if you had any questions.



مهندسی و مدیریت ساخت پروژه

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